So you're not sure what personalisation means?

It may not be the definitive answer but it certainly puts some flesh on the political bones... have a look at the report I did following our conversations with around 200 head teachers earlier this year. It's got 15 propositions that reflect these teachers' views of what personalisation might mean, as well as some of the practical examples of what they're up to now in their schools, and the challenges ahead as they see them.

Posted by on 20 May 2004
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Extended schools

John Craig was quoted in this EducationGuardian.co.uk article on extended schools.

Posted by on 19 May 2004
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Jake 2.0

Every now and then Demos pamphlets strike a chord in ways we can't predict. System Failure by Demos associate Jake Chapman is one of those. It never really had any big splash media coverage, it just spread by word of mouth from civil servant to civil servant until we realised we'd run out of copies. So we've brought out a second edition which includes a new preface by Jake reflecting on the experience of becoming something of a guru in Whitehall.

Posted by Paul Miller on 19 May 2004
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Wi-Fly

Here's one for the globe-trotters among you - Lufthansa have installed Wi-fi internet access on transatlantic flights. Along with GNER putting it in first class on their trains, it seems modes of transport are the latest battleground for the ever extending tentacles of internet access.

Posted by Paul Miller on 18 May 2004
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Learning about Personalisation

A very worthy and valuable successor to Working Laterally, Charlie Leadbeater's pamphlet is the second in the series produced in partnership with the DfES and the National College for School Leadership.Not even in print yet, you can now download a copy of Learning about Personalisation from the website.

Posted by James Page on 10 May 2004
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Die, Strategy News

We're a year or so off an election, and six months behind the US electoral cycle. This post by NYU media academic Jay Rosen explains why we won't be reading much about parties' policies, but a continuous story about how they're selling their policies to the electorate. In other words, 'strategy news'. In Die, Strategy News Rosen identifies five characteristics of strategy news: 1.) winning and losing are the central plot device, 2.) metaphors of war, competitive sports...

Posted by on 09 May 2004
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TV dinners: eat your greens

Scottish Executive is investigating whether BBC Scotland's soap River City could be a vehicle for changing public behaviour, according to Scotland on Sunday. Depending on your perspective, this is either good news: raising awareness of issues through drama and characters, rather than policy and political rhetoric; or bad news: government co-opts state broadcaster as propaganda tool. On balance, I think this is an approach worth considering and the Beeb is right to give the idea a cautious...

Posted by on 09 May 2004
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Demos fails to predict unintended consequence shock

Right, we've had a complaint. Not exactly a formal one (it was made in the pub last week by someone who might unveil his identity in the comments below), but serious nonetheless.The complaint is that the Demos Open Access policy may be having an unintended detrimental impact on the world's forests.You see (so I'm told) whenever researchers at certain other think tanks can't think of what to write, they now mosey on over to the Demos online catalogue and download a few things f...

Posted by Paul Miller on 07 May 2004
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Bookworms and Networks

[via IWire]Valdis Crebs has produced a new networked representation of the purchasing pattern of a selection of political books. Although personally unsure of what to make of this, it's got me thinking'The New York Times speculated last year about the possible political implications of a previous attempt, whilst Will Davies discusses the potential impact on literary criticism.An interesting exercise for the next away day?!

Posted by Duncan O'Leary on 05 May 2004
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Tax Cheats and Tuition Fees

The Higher Education Contribution Scheme (HECS) was introduced in Australia in 1989. It has been an influential model for other countries, and some of the features of the proposed UK system appear to have been borrowed from it.According to researchers at Australian National University in Canberra, however, the introduction of HECS has had a surprising and unwelcome effect on people's attitudes to the tax system.Like the UK the Australian tax system relies heavily on a regime of self-asses...

Posted by Paul Joseph on 05 May 2004
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