Escaping Flatland

"Escaping this flatland," Tutfe has written, "is the essential task of envisioning information, for all the interesting worlds (physical, biological, imaginary, human) that we seek to understand are inevitably and happily multivariate in nature."Indeed.His most recent booklet, The Cognitive Style of Powerpoint" will be arriving in our office next week.The Work of Edward Tufte and Graphics Press

Posted by on 26 Jun 2003
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Journey into the heart of the US space programme

Yesterday, we met with John Schumacher, the new Chief of Staff at NASA. Getting into NASA isn't the easiest thing to do. We underwent rigorous security checks and has to submit all our questions in advance. However, when we met them, they were helpful enough, and gave us a far from weightless pile of glossy NASA material to read. The one area they weren't particularly keen to discuss was the growing militarization of space, which will be a central concern of our report. They did ackno...

Posted by on 26 Jun 2003
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Colonizing space - the solution to overcrowding

Next time you're crushed in the tube or navigating the tides of tourists around Westminster, remember: there is a long-term solution to the problems of overcrowding. Melissa and I met yesterday with Brian Chase, Executive Director of the National Space Society, a small but influential lobby group in Washington. In the short term, their goal is to promote human space flight and get the Shuttle programme restarted. But longer term, they are more ambitious. As their founding statement of phi...

Posted by on 25 Jun 2003
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Network Governance US-style

Day 2 in DC. Melissa and I met yesterday with Rob Atkinson, the Vice President of the Progressive Policy Institute. Amongst the items we discussed is a report they've just published called 'Network Government for the Digital Age', which echoes many Demos themes around systems, complexity and public service transformation. Jake Chapman's work is cited in the report, so good to know we're having an influence on debates over here!Check out the report here.

Posted by on 25 Jun 2003
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Landmark decision on affirmative action

Yesterday the US Supreme Court by a narrow margin ruled in favour of affirmative action. The court case itself as well as the ruling are proof of the continuing divisive nature of the issue of race in the US. To read more click here and/or here.

Posted by Julia Huber on 24 Jun 2003
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Spot the difference competition

Take a look at the cabinet from 1997 and compare it to the 2003 version. I can only spot three people who've stayed in the same job. The old BBC logo looks funny too.

Posted by Paul Miller on 18 Jun 2003
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Governing by learning

Geoff Mulgan has an interesting piece on openDemocracy that I urge you all to read. It's perhaps best summed up by the final paragraph:"The ultimate prize is that, in this emerging global commons, the governments which are quickest on their feet, most willing to adapt and learn, will be the ones that serve their citizens best."Tom will be responding via oD next week.

Posted by Paul Miller on 16 Jun 2003
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Money can buy you love

Here's a puzzle: how much money would you need to raise to elect a US president who's serious about campaign finance reform?I don't have the answer, but it seems an increasingly important question, as the New York Times reports. President Bush is anticipated to raise more in two weeks than all of the Democrat contenders put together have raised in the last three months. Scary.Read more.

Posted by Paul Joseph on 16 Jun 2003
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Going Digital

I went along yesterday to the BBC launch of some new figures suggesting Digital Terrestrial Television (DTT) is taking off in the UK. I have to admit that I can't really see how the new digital world of television radically changes us from being a nation of couch potato goggle box watching billy no-mates.... but that might just be me.

Posted by Paul Miller on 10 Jun 2003
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Ten dollars for every word you write

In case you haven't noticed, the boys and girls over the road are sponsoring another essay prize in conjunction with The Economist. This year the title is 'Do we need nature?' - 2,000 words are due by the 22nd August and you stand to pocket $20,000 if you win.In our youfs a few of us have won this kind of thing (although none of us have won that much!). It got me wondereing whether maybe we should run one? Pros and cons in the comments box please.Click here for more about the She...

Posted by Paul Miller on 05 Jun 2003
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