National_security_web-1
Authors
Charlie Edwards
Publication Type
Pamphlet
Publication Date
2007-12-10
ISBN
978 1 84180 190
Cost
10.0

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The report provides a balanced analysis, examining both successes and failures in national policy, and offers an innovative set of recommendations which should be of interest to policy-makers, officials and analysts alike.

Dr Paul Cornish, Head, International Security Programme, Chatham House

This is one of the most innovative analyses of the world's new security challenges that I have seen. By arguing for systems-based analysis of security challenges, a transparent national security apparatus, and a focus on public value, "National Security for the Twenty-First Century" proposes a radical departure from conventional national-security analysis and policy which is manifestly failing to provide the comprehensive human security that our societies and future generations need.

Thomas Homer-Dixon, George Ignatieff Chair of Peace and Conflict Studies at the Trudeau Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies at University College, University of Toronto. 

This is an important contribution to the current debate on national security. Readable, relevant and provocative the report makes sense of a complex area of policy and offers some valuable ideas for how the British Government should respond to the threats and hazards of the 21st century.

Sir David Omand, Visiting Professor, King’s College London and former Security and Intelligence Co-ordinator, Cabinet Office

The government remains structured around functions and services with separate budgets for defence, foreign affairs, intelligence and development. Whitehall departments, intelligence agencies and the police forces that make up the security architecture have changed very little in the past two decades, despite the end of the Cold War and the attack on the World Trade Centre in 2001.

Based on a 12 month research project, this pamphlet sets out an approach to national security drawing on reforms and innovations from governments elsewhere in Europe and the United States and suggests some new ideas designed to shape the future of the national security architecture.